Dysregulated Diurnal Cortisol Pattern

Dysregulated Diurnal Cortisol Pattern

This Fertility & Pregnancy Institute library entry is in response to a question about dysregulated, diurnal cortisol pattern or daily cortisol rhythm.

So this was a question about dysregulated, diurnal cortisol pattern or daily cortisol rhythm. The normal curve of cortisol (we talked about this a little bit I believe in the last session) rises in the morning. That’s what mobilizes your energy to help you get out of bed in the morning. Then it starts to decline. It should go down over the course of the afternoon. This is a cortisol pattern where cortisol is high, it’s high throughout the day. Then the one on the right is a cortisol pattern, where the cortisol doesn’t rise the way that it should in the morning. It stays higher than it should the rest of the day. So it’s almost like it’s in reverse and these are two common patterns that happen with cortisol dysregulation, with repeated activation of the HPA axis. 

The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis(HPA), and the body’s stress response with the repeated exposure to chronic stress that isn’t going away whether it’s depression, anxiety, being fearful, financial stress, really stressful work, stressful relationships, trauma from childhood present-day trauma, all of these things contribute to chronic stress and dysregulated HPA function. And the cortisol pattern is a rep as a reflection of dysregulated, a peach HPA function. So we see this very commonly in people who experienced a lot of adversity in childhood, it tends to stay with them throughout their lives. So I think that what I just want to say is that this pattern on the right is one that we see a lot, and I think is very common in people who are driven and constantly working to achieve things who work hard. I think that’s most of us, if not all of us. It’s not unusual to see this so let’s talk about things that can be done. 

This needs a personalized approach, it’s not something that we can address, or make a blanket statement about because there are so many other factors that play here. Your other stress hormones, your other sex hormones, a film so many other things. Your new nutritional status, all kinds of things. But these are just some things that can be done in general. So making sure that your digestion is working well, not having caffeine, say cycling in the complex carbohydrates (as I was talking about earlier). Dr. Alan Christian’s and his work seems to be useful when there’s cortisol dysregulation. Getting at least seven hours of sleep each night and napping when you can during the day. 

I never nap, I know that that’s not very realistic for most people. But if you’re able to, that’s what’s known to be useful in this case, and reducing the length and the intensity of your exercise. Also, exercising in the morning may be best to help to raise the morning cortisol, or and this is one of those places where this is very individual. Identifying a point in the diurnal rhythm of point during the day, when cortisol is within normal range, and exercising at that time because when we exercise, especially if we exercise long and hard on a dysregulated cortisol pattern, it can become It can worsen the problem. Then remember that cortisol is very much related to your adrenal function if adrenals are part of the HPA axis. So possibly this is not for everybody. This is very individual, it’s better for you to work with somebody. If you’re working with brandy from FPI, this is a really good thing to work on with her because she can give you much more personalized recommendations based on your actual biochemistry. 

Dysregulated Diurnal Cortisol Pattern

This Fertility & Pregnancy Institute library entry is in response to a question about dysregulated, diurnal cortisol pattern or daily cortisol rhythm.

So this was a question about dysregulated, diurnal cortisol pattern or daily cortisol rhythm. The normal curve of cortisol (we talked about this a little bit I believe in the last session) rises in the morning. That’s what mobilizes your energy to help you get out of bed in the morning. Then it starts to decline. It should go down over the course of the afternoon. This is a cortisol pattern where cortisol is high, it’s high throughout the day. Then the one on the right is a cortisol pattern, where the cortisol doesn’t rise the way that it should in the morning. It stays higher than it should the rest of the day. So it’s almost like it’s in reverse and these are two common patterns that happen with cortisol dysregulation, with repeated activation of the HPA axis. 

The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis(HPA), and the body’s stress response with the repeated exposure to chronic stress that isn’t going away whether it’s depression, anxiety, being fearful, financial stress, really stressful work, stressful relationships, trauma from childhood present-day trauma, all of these things contribute to chronic stress and dysregulated HPA function. And the cortisol pattern is a rep as a reflection of dysregulated, a peach HPA function. So we see this very commonly in people who experienced a lot of adversity in childhood, it tends to stay with them throughout their lives. So I think that what I just want to say is that this pattern on the right is one that we see a lot, and I think is very common in people who are driven and constantly working to achieve things who work hard. I think that’s most of us, if not all of us. It’s not unusual to see this so let’s talk about things that can be done. 

This needs a personalized approach, it’s not something that we can address, or make a blanket statement about because there are so many other factors that play here. Your other stress hormones, your other sex hormones, a film so many other things. Your new nutritional status, all kinds of things. But these are just some things that can be done in general. So making sure that your digestion is working well, not having caffeine, say cycling in the complex carbohydrates (as I was talking about earlier). Dr. Alan Christian’s and his work seems to be useful when there’s cortisol dysregulation. Getting at least seven hours of sleep each night and napping when you can during the day. 

I never nap, I know that that’s not very realistic for most people. But if you’re able to, that’s what’s known to be useful in this case, and reducing the length and the intensity of your exercise. Also, exercising in the morning may be best to help to raise the morning cortisol, or and this is one of those places where this is very individual. Identifying a point in the diurnal rhythm of point during the day, when cortisol is within normal range, and exercising at that time because when we exercise, especially if we exercise long and hard on a dysregulated cortisol pattern, it can become It can worsen the problem. Then remember that cortisol is very much related to your adrenal function if adrenals are part of the HPA axis. So possibly this is not for everybody. This is very individual, it’s better for you to work with somebody. If you’re working with brandy from FPI, this is a really good thing to work on with her because she can give you much more personalized recommendations based on your actual biochemistry.